36: Block chains and urban analytics

I argued in an earlier piece that game-changing advances in urban analytics may well depend on technological change. One such possibility is the introduction of block chain software. a block is a set of accounts at a node. This is part of a network of many nodes many of which – in some cases all? – are connected. Transactions are recorded in the appropriate nodal accounts with varying degrees of openness. It is this openness that guarantees veracity and verifiability. This technology is considered to be a game changer in the financial world – with potential job losses because a block chain system excludes the ‘middlemen’ who normally record the transactions. Illustrations of the concept on the internet almost all rely on the bitcoin technology as the key example.

The ideas of ‘accounts at nodes’ and ‘transactions between nodes’ resonate very strongly with the core elements of urban analytics and models – the location of activities and spatial interaction. In the bitcoin case, the nodes are presumably account holders but it is no stretch of the imagination to imagine the nodes as being associated with spatial addresses. There must also be a connection to the ‘big data’ agenda and the ‘internet of things’. Much of the newly available real time data is transactional and one can imagine it being transmitted to blocks and used to update data bases on a continuous basis. This would have a very obvious role in applied retail modelling for example.

If this proved to be a mechanism for handling urban and regional data, and because a block chain is not owned by anyone, this could be a parallel internet for our research community.

This is a shorter than usual blog piece because to develop the idea, I need to do a lot more work!! The core concepts are complicated and not easy to follow. I have watched two You Tube videos – an excellent one from the Kahn Academy. I recommend these but what I would really like is someone to take on the challenge of (a) really understanding block chains and (b) thinking through possible urban analytics applications!

Alan Wilson

April  2016

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *