42. Best practice

Everything we do, or are responsible for, should aim at adopting ‘best practice’. This is easier said than done! We need knowledge, capability and capacity. Then maybe there are three categories through which we can seek best practice: (1) from ‘already in practice’ elsewhere; (2) could be in practice somewhere but isn’t: the research has been done but hasn’t been transferred; (3) problem identified, but research needed.

How do we acquire the knowledge? Through reading, networking, cpe courses, visits. Capability is about training, experience, acquiring skills. Capacity is about the availability of capability – access to it – for the services (let us say) that need it. Medicine provides an obvious example; local government another. How do each of 164 local authorities in England acquire best practice? Dissemination strategies are obviously important. We should also note that there may be central government responsibilities. We can expect markets to deliver skills, capabilities and capacities – through colleges, universities and, in a broad sense, industry itself (in its most refined way through ‘corporate universities’). But in many cases, there will be a market failure and government intervention becomes essential. In a field such as medicine, which is heavily regulated, the Government takes much of the responsibility for ensuring supply of capability and capacity. There are other fields, where in early stage development, consultants provide the capacity until it becomes mainstream – GMAP in relation to retailing being an example from my own experience. (See the two ‘spin-out blogs.)

How does all this work for cities, and in particular, for urban analytics? Good analytics provide a better base for decision making, planning and problem solving in city government. This needs a comprehensive information system which can be effectively interrogated. This can be topped with a high-level ‘dashboard’ with a hierarchy of rich underpinning levels. Warning lights might flash at the top to highlight problems lower down the hierarchy for further investigation. It needs a simulation (modelling) capacity for exploring the consequences of alternative plans. Neither of these needs are typically met. In some specific areas, it is potentially, and sometimes actually, OK: in transport planning in government; in network optimisation for retailers for example. A small number of consultants can and do provide skills and capability. But in general, these needs are not met, often not even recognised. This seems to be a good example of a market failure. There is central government funding and action – through research councils and particularly perhaps, Innovate UK. The ‘best practice’ material exists – so we are somewhere in between categories 1 and 2 of the introductory paragraph above. This tempts me to offer as a conjecture the obvious ‘solution’: what is needed are top-class demonstrators. If the benefits were evident, then dissemination mechanisms would follow!

Alan Wilson
June 2016

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